Wine Talk

Snooth User: Richard Foxall

Bastille Day 2016--Special Whatcha Drinking Today edition

Posted by Richard Foxall, Jul 14, 2016.

If I had a Twitter account, I'd probably remind all my friends to drink French today.  (Funny how I don't really celebrate Italian independence day, or Republic Day, or the anniversary of the unification of Italy, which unluckily for it falls on March 17.)  Not trying to get too political, so let's just say that France certainly has a big impact on anyone who drinks wine.

We haven't decided what is for dinner, although my wife suggested I make crepes; we could stuff them with crab and salmon for us, maybe cheese or chicken for the girls.  If we take that route, I've got a white CdR from La Cabotte (pretty pedestrian, but it's chilled), or I can try to get a Huet in the overstuffed fridge.  If we go another route, we've got more choices in red, but I'm thinking summer wants lighter reds, so maybe a Marc Bredif Chinon, or maybe a burgundy. 

If I wasn't working, I'd have salade nicoise and rose for lunch. 

Replies

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Reply by vin0vin0, Jul 14, 2016.

Had some nice tomatoes and cukes from the garden, a bit of leftover sirloin and some roasted taters/peppers. We washed this all down with this nice French rose.

We're getting together tomorrow evening with the two other couples that went to Alsace with us, planning on taking a couple bottles of Cremant de Alsace to the party.

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 14, 2016.

Had a a couple bottles of a 1er Cru Chablis (Montmains, Closerie des Alisiers, Stephane Brocard) with a couple other people at dinner last night (already the 15th here). Clams a la Campania for starters and planked salmon covered with pepper jack during the baking process as the main. Vichysoisse and a salad, also a tarte tatin dessert with Calvados and coffee. A bigger Burgundy white from down in the Cote d'Or might've been better (or maybe even a different varietal from the Loire), but that's what I had at hand and it was too much hassle to run to my offsite cellar. These were in the house because I'd been gifted them last month.

May be a function of age, but with the heat and humidity now I'm definitely finding whites a lot more refreshing than reds. 2/3 a bottle of white and I'm still energetic and hopping around. Half a bottle of red in this weather and I'm weighted down, ready for a nap. Rainy season's still upon us so it's cooler today, and maybe red may again be in the cards. Yesterday was one of those in-between scorchers that broke at night with some dark, looming thunderstorms. Those thunderstorms are harbingers of the end of the rainy season, though, so the real heat is about to begin.

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Reply by JonDerry, Jul 15, 2016.

I have been talking with some fellow wino's about an upcoming tasting on 7/30, so had the idea to text a local friend late last night (after my son fell asleep) if we should open a nice bottle of white burgundy, a 2010 Ponsot Morey St. Denis 1er Blanc Clos des Mont Luisants. 

Luckily, he was over in a few minutes, and with an unexpected (well, not really considering the source) surprise in the form of a 1982 Vosne Romanee 1er Chaumes. It proceeded to be one of the best burgs I've had.

1982 Viard Freres Vosne Romanee 1er Chaumes was a stunner last night, showing a beautiful, intoxicating nose, rich in pomegranate, dried cherry fruit and complex spice. Similar on the palate, heavier on the freshness, with a slight menthol and off note, but the fruit, spice, and buffered tannins more than made up for it. The fruit, freshness, and tannin were all sublime. At peak, if slightly past, and really stellar. One wonders if a heavier/traditional oak regimen allowed this wine to show so well at 33+ years old.

2010 Ponsot Morey St. Denis 1er Clos des Monts Luisants (Blanc, 100% Aligote)

The nose is pleasant but half closed, and the color of straw gold is age appropriate. Abundant, but relatively softer acids and tannins (to me the main difference between Aligote and Chard). The oak is well judged and framed, lending a hint of sweetness to the tart lemon fruit. Very nice and effortless. While this could be enjoyed now, it will should continue to improve over the next several years.

Having some issues with my desktop photo situation, so I'll just go with the old iphone upload, sorry PC users.

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 15, 2016.

Always cracks me up when so many people who should know better think Burgundy will only last a decade, and doesn't mature over a longer period.

You really enjoy Aligote, without, say, turning it into Kir? So mono-dimensional and lacking in synchronicity to me compared to chard. In my experience it never sings on its own.

Sounds like a very nice impromptu shared imbibe. Love how those often come together so surprisingly well.

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Reply by JonDerry, Jul 15, 2016.

Yes, the age-worthiness of Burgundy was on full display last night. Hope to find some more from '82, '78, etc.

Aligote was very nice. Have also had a good one by Hubert Lignier. It's definitely Chardonnay light, but I enjoy it when taken seriously, though the grape has really suffered from neglect in Burgundy since phylloxera. There used to be planting a in Grand Cru and more 1er sites such as Corton, Chassagne, etc. and now it's been left with scant base level (Bourgogne) plantings in the Cote de Nuits aside from this Mont Luisants, but it's mainly relegated to Bouzeron. 

Would be fun to do a side by side from the same vineyard, even though Chardonnay is the superior grape it would be interesting to see by what margin in a fair fight.

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 15, 2016.

Well it wouldn't be a fair fight from my experience. Probably had somewhere between 10 and 20 cases of them over the years and nary an attention grabber. Immediate response by everyone in the group: 'nice try, but where's the creme de cassis'? Part of that volume came from some curmudgeonly taste-offs over a couple of weeks in France where a couple of us said 'it can't all be bad, let's find the good stuff'. I remember Ponsot's and a couple more being almost drinkable.

Hey, I'm always willing to be surprised here in this new millenium. Just make sure the cassis is handy...  ;-)

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Reply by GregT, Jul 15, 2016.

Well to celebrate I had a Syrah. I figure it's from France anyway so that's close enough. Can't touch JD's experience - nice work amigo!

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Reply by Lucha Vino, Jul 21, 2016.

The Tour de France visited Mt. Ventoux on Bastille Day again this year.  I had a Domain Sorin rose' from Provence to celebrate.  My experience was way better than Chris Froome's!

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 21, 2016.

Google's not letting me near that link, Lucha.

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Reply by rckr1951, Jul 21, 2016.

DMCKER - Drop the "s and it'll work.

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 22, 2016.

Which S is that?

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Reply by rckr1951, Jul 22, 2016.

The "s at the end of Froome, but I assume you already knew that.

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 22, 2016.

Nothing to do with the dead 'clingnews' link. Didn't bother doing a google search off the name.

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Reply by Lucha Vino, Jul 25, 2016.

whoops.  Copy/Paste error. http://www.cyclingnews.com/tour-de-france/stage-12/results/

Froome crashed into the back of a race moto and in a moment of panic started running to the finish line.  I'm pretty sure there is a rule that you have to cross the finish line WITH your bike!

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Reply by dmcker, Jul 26, 2016.

Sounds like a bit of mayhem. Sure there weren't some luchadors in that mix, Vino?

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Reply by Lucha Vino, Jul 28, 2016.

Could have been.  We like to keep a low profile, so it wouldn't be surprising if a luchador (or two) were responsible for bringing the moto to a full stop!

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Aug 4, 2016.

Further up this thread, there was discussion of whether Aligote was worth making into a wine on its own or only just for Kir.  Well, here's a less than ringing endorsement for it on its own in the latest "Dirty Dozen" from Wine House in San Francisco: 

2013 Aligoté, Domaine Fichet $14.98 net price, $13.48 reorder
Domaine Fichet broke away from the local co-op to make wine on their own beginning in 1976. Situated in Igé, just north of Mâcon, Fichet planted a bit of Aligoté in 1998. It is textbook Aligoté with its bright acid finish. Traditionally, Aligoté is used for making Kir. So if inclined - add a bit of Cassis - otherwise pair alongside oysters, prawns or fresh goat cheese.


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