Wine & Food

Snooth User: Claybe

Best Recommendations for Thanksgiving Wine

Posted by Claybe, Nov 8, 2009.

Hi! I am new here and wanted to get your opinions on a wine for Thanksgiving dinner. I will need several bottles of wine to go with the traditional Thanksgiving dinner of oven baked Turkey, sides, etc. Please let me know your recommendations!

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Replies

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Reply by hhotdog, Nov 9, 2009.

a nice zin maybe...i tried a local winemaker's pinot grigio that drank like a riesling (black Rocknot bad at all and under $20.)...i'm sure that greg has some wonderful suggestions. pick his wine mind! everyone here has always been helpful with their great advice.

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Reply by hhotdog, Nov 9, 2009.

woops "Black Rock Riesling"...typo, hehehehe!

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Reply by rhill2990, Nov 9, 2009.

I am also having a classic Thanksgiving. I have a very nice Pinot Noir picked out.

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Reply by gooselee4, Nov 9, 2009.

I am hosting my 1st Thanksgiving dinner. I was told dry Riesling is the perfect Thanksgiving wine. I'm going with a dry Riesling from the winery I work for (South River Vineyard)-crisp, acidic & slightly fruity (makes a great summer wine as well). I also think that a light Pinot Noir would be nice. I'm wondering what wine would go good w/ pumpkin pie though?

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Reply by MReff, Nov 9, 2009.

IMO, the only dry Riesling worth buying is the Finger Lakes. Weimer comes to mind for me!

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Reply by Flandry, Nov 9, 2009.

I am very new to Snooth, and I have always heard that Riesling and Chardonnay, ( but not too oaky), seem to be preferred. The risk with a very oaky Chardonnay is that it may pair well with the turkey, but it may overpower everything else on the table, like cranberry sauce, potatoes, corn bread, squash etc., the so called sides and fixings. The trick is to find out what else will be served in advance, and take that into consideration too. Pinot Grigio sounds like a nice middle of the road compromise, and so does pinot noir, too. I wonder if an Australian or New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc would work too?

F Landry
Burlington, MA.

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Reply by MReff, Nov 9, 2009.

Flandry, SAv Blanc does work well, in fact most wines works well except for latest vintages cabernet or merlot based wines. If you have some aged ones such as bordeaux it would work as well.

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Reply by TL NJ, Nov 9, 2009.

I agree with everyone's notes on a good Sav Blanc, Chard or Riesling pairing well with Turkey. but for Thanksgiving Turkey, I actually prefer something a little more "festive". Some have mentioned Zins - I agree with that, especially the big zins - they go great with Turkey. But I also think Bordeaux goes great with a Thanksgiving bird. Claybe, you mentioned that you needed "several bottles" so some of the top-name Bordeaux's may be out, but there are some very decent mid-range priced Bordeaux that would do the job just fine. I would say that any "Bordeaux "blend"" from California would also work.

I dont know where you are from, Claybe, but if you are from the NY area, I have also found that some of the Cabernet Franc's from Long Island go excellent with the Thanksgiving Turkey (Jamesport, Paumanock, or Borghese).

However, if you are fixed on a "white", then I refer back to the Sauv Blanc, or German Rieslings.

Cheers, and Happy Thanksgiving!

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Reply by chadrich, Nov 9, 2009.

I think Riesling and Zin are the best choices, as already addressed above. As to the pumpkin pie question...I'm contemplating a tawny port of a Pedro Ximenez sherry such as this one...
http://www.snooth.com/wine/bodegas-...

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Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Nov 9, 2009.

Lambrusco!

No seriously.

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Reply by gooselee4, Nov 9, 2009.

Thanks for the port recommendation, chadrich-I will look into that!

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Reply by TL NJ, Nov 9, 2009.

I can personally vouch for the Pedro X Sherry / Pumpkin Pie combination. Its a great match.

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Reply by corskier, Nov 9, 2009.

Rose, the drier the better! Most go fantastic with everything on a thanksgiving table. Viognier also goes well, although some tend to overpower with their perfumy nose.

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Reply by h2w4, Nov 10, 2009.

Gewurztraminer, Reisling, unoaked Chard for whites, Zin, Sangiovese or a lighter style Pinot Noir for reds usually work well IMO. Bigger reds can be a bit too much with a meal that has such a wide range of spices and flavors. While it may work well with one or two items it can be hard for a bigger red to match up with all of the sides as well as the bird.

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Reply by Mark Will, Nov 10, 2009.

Forgive me but I have zinned!!

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Reply by sanabavy, Nov 10, 2009.

If you want to do a different white, gruner veltliner might be a good play, as its really versatile.

For reds, I will likely opt for pinot or zin, as many have mentioned. Not only are there going to be a lot of flavor profiles on the table, but folks tend to eat heavily during this rich meal, so that lends additional support for a lighter wine choice, imo.

Def cracking some port for dessert, as well!

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Reply by VegasOenophile, Nov 10, 2009.

It really depends if you're more a "do what you like" type of person or a "follow the usual pairing suggestions" type of person. I personally have enjoyed a bright zinfandel that went very well with the turkey and all the fixings and would imagine a list of pinot noirs and chardonnays that would be stellar. I just picked up a smokin' deal on a Puligny-Montrachet that I might sav for Thanksgiving dinner. For me, a riesling might be a bit light and sweet for the main courses, but might go good with dessert or as an aperitif before the meal. It truly all comes down to what you like and want to try. My advice is to not fear experimentation. If you open something that doesn't jive with dinner, save it for later and try something else! You never know what combo you might think is best until you try things out. Good luck. I am sure plenty will post their turkey day pairings and I look forward to seeing what people did.

I also agree with Gregory about lambrusco! That's a solid option.

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Reply by fibo86, Nov 10, 2009.

For your starers you could go for the dry riesling or dry sherry (amontillado)
Then maybe a Chardonnay, Pinot, Zin and even a dry sparkling Shiraz (goes great with turkey) or as Greg says Lambrusco.
Then perhaps Sweet sherry or port to finish (or to go on ice cream)

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Reply by jpdemers, Nov 10, 2009.

For a white, I usually go with a medium-dry Riesling; a spatlese will complement the turkey while standing up to the stuffing and cranberries. You can get good values from Alsace, and from Oregon's Willamette Valley. For a red, you can hardly go wrong with a zin, but I tend to go for something sturdier like a Rhone red. I'm partial to Chateauneuf-du-Pape, but there are comparable Grenache-Syrah blends from Spain that are very affordable. (I've tried Bordeaux and cabernets, but to my taste, they're overkill.) And don't forget one bottle of prosecco, to start things off with a proper toast! When you finally sit back and loosen your belts, a Moscato d'Asti makes for a nice finale: delicious, inexpensive, and light on the alcohol.

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Reply by Claybe, Nov 10, 2009.

Hey guys and gals!

Thanks for the recommendations. I am not that fond of Rieslings, but may try one before to see what I think. Years ago I had an incredible Chard with Thanksgiving (can't remember which one) that was really buttery and went with everything on the plate! It was incredible and I would love to re-create that (because everything goes with butter right?!?). I am thinking something very smooth and buttery would be nice. Keep them coming and thanks for the warm reception!

Claybe

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