Wine Talk

Snooth User: vinolover7

Chardonnay party

Posted by vinolover7, Oct 20, 2010.

I want to have a party that explores Chardonnay.  I want to show four, and want to explore different styles ranging from Pouilly-Fuisse to a very oaky butter bomb!  Any suggestions for the wine list?

Replies

8
549
Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Oct 20, 2010.

Budget and where are you located?

3
8
Reply by vinolover7, Oct 20, 2010.

I'm stuck in the middle of Ohio, and would like bottles between $12 and $25, So far I'm looking at Giles Noblet, possibly Thorn Clark and Wente Mourning Fog. Thanks for any advice.

8
549
Reply by Girl Drink Drunk, Oct 20, 2010.

Dominique Cornin Macon-Chaintre should be in your price range, as well as La Chablissienne 'Petit Chablis'.  Both are fun bottles.

I can't help on the buttery CA chard, as I can't stand the stuff.  You might think about an unoaked CA chard, to see how it compares with the French.  Morgan is a pretty good example, and is in your budget.

3
8
Reply by vinolover7, Oct 20, 2010.

Thanks, I'll start hunting!

 

20
3575
Reply by Richard Foxall, Oct 20, 2010.

Clos La Chance has an unoaked Cali Chard that is a good one for the money, and a nice example of unoaked--also probably pretty widely available.  My own sense of Wente is that any wine from there should have " mourning" in the name.  (If that's a typo, it's one I like.)  On the oaky/buttery end, when I dug that kind of thing, Fetzer Sundial was a low priced way to taste that effect. My father likes that style and I recently bought Badge at K&L for him based on their description; we agreed that it wasn't actually very oaky or buttery... or really anything.  Inoffensive, but not representative of any kind of chardonnay.

20
3258
Reply by dmcker, Oct 20, 2010.

Another California chard of that style that delivers at a very good price point is Edna Valley down near San Luis Obispo. Certainly plenty of flavor.

And for a French comparison at a reasonable price for its quality, find a St. Veran or Pouilly Fuisse from Olivier Merlin, one of the more interesting youngish winemakers in the Macon area.

0
2383
Reply by GregT, Oct 21, 2010.

If you only have four, you can mix both styles and regions but don't be hasty to draw many conclusions other than observe the differences.  If your interest is really comparing styles, you may want to compare styles w/in a region or nearby regions.  Might be interesting to look at Macon and Beaujolais for example, or something like that.  You can get oaked, unoaked, unsulfured, etc.  And you needn't spend a fortune either.

20
3258
Reply by dmcker, Oct 21, 2010.

Or two Californians, and two Maconnais, if the number need be four. Me, I'd tend to want to go for six.... Don't know the number of people in the tasting, but even if wine's left over, it can certainly be dealt with in a number of ways. Probably not a lot left over, though.  ;-)

152
1968
Reply by napagirl68, Oct 22, 2010.

Russian River Valley and Carneros are my favs here in CA...

always love Selby Chardonnay, chalk hill chardonnay.  balanced and minerally.

Your butterbomb could be a Rombauer Chard... a crowd pleaser because of the sugar... I hate it, but everyone else likes it:-)

Others can advise toward a Burgundian chard.....

Foxall- we seem to have a similar palate (agree with the Wente rating- Yucko) , but I dislike what I have tasted so far in Edna Valley?  Hmmm.

GDD- agree with Morgan, but more so, I like their Sauv Blancs.. especially way back in the mid 90's- they made some outstanding sauv blancs.

20
3258
Reply by dmcker, Oct 22, 2010.

NG, I never said it was the type of wine I buy myself, just that it fits a certain profile, and is better than usual in certain vintages...  ;-)

152
1968
Reply by napagirl68, Oct 22, 2010.

Dmcker... no criticism.. just an observation of my own palate :-)  I found the few from Edna Valley to be lacking in depth... tropical fruit up front, and then died out quickly.  Perhaps I have not tasted enough of the right ones, or maybe my palate is tuned to a different tune.!

We all have different palates-  some newbies are developing, thus the "transitional" wines, like oakey, buttery chards..   rombauer fits this profile... would be  crowd pleaser for most (not all) beginners... I suggest introducing a more balanced chard, as I  and others mentioned in the post above.  But everyone has their suggestions, which are always welcomed and received (hopefully :-)

152
1968
Reply by napagirl68, Oct 22, 2010.

LOL!!! Foxall!  I missed the "mourning fog" ref; til I re-read OP. you are too cute!!

OP- you were right about your misspelling of Morning Fog... you really will be MOURNING fog if you drink that swill... it is a mass produced Chard with a "famous" CA name.  Means nothing.  The wine is substandard.  I would not include it in your tasting.

If no one has mentioned, you can find all types/areas of wines on KLwines.com, and no, I do not work there, just have used them in the past.  They typically do not carry the smaller wineries, which is why I do not use them as often... but they do have a good inventory!

20
3258
Reply by dmcker, Oct 22, 2010.

La Crema is a better 'buttery' chard, but with some finesse, if you're looking for one that I actually occasionally drink. I drank Edna Valley a bit back in the '80s, when they were under different management, and they could at that time provide a decent drinking experience.

20
3575
Reply by Richard Foxall, Oct 23, 2010.

Good call on the La Crema, dmcker--good example of the type, and it's somewhat reasonably priced--not like some "big" California chardonnays. It's good that people can recommend a wine even if the style is not what they favor. A winemaker I know doesn't like the buttery okay chards, either, but succumbs to Pahlmeyer's (they are friends) when he has one because it's such a "good" example of the style.  Frankly, I am pretty much done with American Chardonnay--too much disappointment when the wine is so expensive. It doesn't have to be that way, I learned recently: We stopped in at a winery in the Napa Valley, where the co-owner drew off some really good chardonnay from a barrel.  Wife and I commented that it was not oaky, really lively, minerally... surprised to like it so much.  The grapes came from Yountville, where fog gets trapped.  More burgundian in temp than other parts of the valley.  Owner said, "well, when we bottle it, we will probably put in some that has been aged in oak because that's what the market wants," but she and her husband--the winemaker and former director of ops at Beaulieu--like what she served us, she said.  Sad.  We bought Syrah, Cab and an inexpensive Pinot Grigio, but no chard.

NG--glad you got that jokle, since you are in Wente's backyard. 


Back to Categories

Top Contributors This Month

259386 Snooth User: zufrieden
259386zufrieden
31 posts
1413489 Snooth User: dvogler
1413489dvogler
19 posts
89564 Snooth User: GregT
89564GregT
5 posts

Categories

View All




Snooth Media Network