Wine Talk

Snooth User: dmcker

Crafty

Posted by dmcker, Jan 9, 2016.

Was just reading an article that stated that pregnant women should consider craft beer the same as wine in their drinking strategies. Then an article about craft beer in SLO county. Then saw this:

 

 

Any thoughts?

Replies

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Reply by outthere, Jan 9, 2016.

Is that anything like "Artisan"? It's a winery attempting to appeal to the Millenials. No more, no less.

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Reply by dmcker, Jan 9, 2016.

And what's the bottom label with its slogans about?

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Reply by outthere, Jan 9, 2016.

Marketing. It's a $13 grocery store Cab and a $10 Chardonnay. The label is just a label, bulk wine, no winery by that name. Part of The Wine Group of Livermore.

"Established in 1981, The Wine Group is the world’s third largest winery by volume. Based out of Livermore, CA in the historic Concannon Estate with additional wineries in California, Argentina and Australia. The Wine Group is management-owned and operated. Its portfolio of wines includes Cupcake, Chloe, Trapiche, Concannon Vineyards, Cocobon, Save Me San Francisco and Slow Press."

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Reply by Really Big Al, Jan 9, 2016.

Another wine from Paso Robles to avoid then?

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Reply by outthere, Jan 9, 2016.

Another bulk label to avoid. Paso is not the issue here.

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Reply by Really Big Al, Jan 9, 2016.

Ok.  Thank you.

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Reply by dmcker, Jan 9, 2016.

Somehow, OT, I wasn't expecting a preferred wine experience if that bottle, rather than its digital avatar, were really in front of me. Would be curious to hear their 'craftsperson's' approach to winemaking, rather than anyone's up in, say, Sonoma.

That stylized 'o' in Slow, does it stand for no-go, or theta or an attempt to make the word sound like 'slew' or...? And why does it somehow seem labeled like a whisky bottle? Not to mention (again) those funky catchwordy slogans, which mean exactly what relative to what they claim? How many other winebottles have such on them?

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Reply by outthere, Jan 10, 2016.

What, like "Never rush a great wine", on a 2014 Cab that is already released 7 months ahead of everyone else in California? LOL

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Jan 10, 2016.

Oh, man, OT, you beat me to it.  I saw this on my phone where I can't type well, but I thought that was crazy:  Never rush a wine, but you release it like it's Noveau Beaujolais? (Okay, small exaggeration.)

I know someone whose spouse is pretty high up at TWG.  My acquaintance told me they went to the holiday party and one of the other executives said he worked there so he didn't have to drink their wine.  (In other words, he could afford better.)  They are the worst of the spoofy wine companies. They buy decent stuff for the market it has made, then dumb it down even more.  Pretty much willing to market anything they can sell. They'll steal someone else's idea, too, if given a chance.  (See the Layer Cake vs. Cupcake dispute.)  

Never trust anyone who tells you that they will sell no wine before its time.

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Jan 11, 2016.

BTW, the genesis of TWG is that it arose from Coca Cola's foray into wine.  A group that managed the wine properties eventually broke away; they didn't get all of Coca Cola's wine properties, just the "stars": Mogen David, a cheap vermouth maker.  Started badly and hasn't really improved.

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Reply by dmcker, Jan 11, 2016.

Coca Cola's wanted to be in wine for a long time. Think they owned Sterling for a moment, though after they quickly bailed on it Diageo later acquired it and still holds it even after their wine portfolio divestiture. TWG's very skimpy website gives a patchwork history. Not too surprising that Coca Cola hasn't gotten it right since they took so long to get fresh juice working for them, because their starting point and all-along-forte has been beverages that last a long time and kill things off rather than are killed by temperature and oxygen. Heard rumblings even in the '90s that they weren't getting the fresh juice market right, even though they'd owned Minute Maid since the beginning of the '60s. Of course by the beginning of the naughties they bought Odwalla, which effectively killed off one of my go-to brands on supermarket visits when traveling to CA.

And I guess some markets just couldn't wait for the company to get the wine and soft drink mix right, so took things into their own hands. Have to admit I was shocked. Utterly floored, the first time I saw what the Basques were doing...

 

The people who started The Wine Group were all Coca Cola alums it seems, and so perhaps it's not so strange that they haven't gotten it right, either? Though that's just us wishing for better, more honest product. The bean counters in both groups are laughing all the way to the bank.

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Reply by dmcker, Jan 11, 2016.

When I first encountered 'Kalimotxo' I joked with my companions that it must have been invented by the Black Devils of Kali. So I laughed when I looked up the Wiki explanation and saw all the other names for it in other countries:

Alternative names include Rioja libre (from "Rioja", and "Cuba Libre"), kali, motxo. In Chile the drink is known as jote (Chilean Spanish for the black vulture). In Romania it is often called motorină, meaning diesel fuel, and in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, the Republic of Macedonia, Croatia, Slovenia and other former Yugoslav republics it is known as bambus (meaning bamboo) and musolini (as in Benito Mussolini). The person who mixes bamboo 50:50, is often defined as "gulozan"[clarify]. In the Czech Republic it is known as houba (meaning mushroom), and in Hungary as Vadász (meaning hunter) or vörösboros kóla or VBK for short. In Mozambique and South Africa it is known as Catemba, and in Germany it is sometimes called Kalte Muschi (cold pussy) or Korea.

 

 

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Reply by Richard Foxall, Jan 11, 2016.

Man I love almost everything gustatory from that part of the world, but that's nasty.

By now, the Coca Cola alums are long gone, I'm sure.  The thing was spun off and underwent a management-led LBO and still has a management owned structure, so the upper level execs still have to put in for an ownership stake--anyone over a certain level is a partner.  No apparent positive effect on quality--once a culture is in place and its profitable, hard to change that.  I mean, if you cared about making good wine, would you go work there?  They occasionally buy a decent brand and then ruin it--they did that to some PN maker in SRH, if I recall correctly.  What's grossly unfair is that my acquaintance claims they get treated as ITB when they go to good wineries.  Ick. 


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