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Snooth User: outthere

Non wine related, my new project...

Original post by outthere, May 5, 2014.

My backyard kitchen project. Started on it yesterday, trenched for water and power and ran the pipes. Today I trenched part of the drainage and built the forms for the foundation. Hoping to have this semi-completed for the Syrah offline in July.

I need a covered area for my Big Green Egg and will build it into the countertop. Adding a huge sink, lots of prep space and a reefer under the counter. Should pour the concrete Sunday as we are doing the HVS Tour and Dinner on Saturday.

I'm pretty excited about this.

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Replies

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Reply by dmcker, May 12, 2014.

Interesting how we forgot to use hammer and nails once power tools fit in hand.  My uncle's generation would snort.  ;-)

 

Looking very good, and nice to get vicarious pleasure at this great distance from watching a project come to fruition.

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Reply by dvogler, May 12, 2014.

Without sounding snarky, what else have you built if you've run out of nails?  Those framing nails don't come in boxes of 100!  And why do you have a framing nailer?  :)

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Reply by outthere, May 12, 2014.

You sure ask a lot of questions ;)

Back in 2006 I built an addition onto my House. Added a BR and laundry room downstairs and Master BR Master bath upstairs. The framing nailer was a must. Since that time I have built a few fences, raised planting beds, decks and assorted other projects. The nailer gets good use. I've got a box full of collated 6d's but that ain't gonna fly. The big nails are all used up. Probably have a good 10lbs of galvanized framing nails but I'm too old/worn out and my carpal tunnel prevents me from using a hammer too much.

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Reply by dvogler, May 12, 2014.

Valid excuse!  It just seems incongruous for you guys and your massive wine collections to have such a complete set of construction tools!  I think I'm the only blue-collar guy here!  Looking good BTW

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Reply by dmcker, May 12, 2014.

OK, have to ask, OT. Wasn't going to about the patio and outdoor kitchen but now with BR and laundry room and master upstairs entering the conversation I've gotta ask how you enjoyed the Sonoma permitting process. If it's anything like Alameda, Marin and San Mateo it can't have been a lot of fun.

My baby sister has been a city planner in San Mateo, San Rafael and Berkeley. Listening to the stories about how she and her colleagues wade in to regulate minor garage updates immediately leads to heated back and forths between the two of us. Somehow it's become such a regular occurrence that when I meet her during my irregularly intervaled visits, something feels missing if we don't get into it at least once....

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Reply by dvogler, May 12, 2014.

Oooohh dangerous ground there DM...

As OT's lawyer, I advise him not to comment.  :)

I guess your sister never woke up Christmas morning to see a new boat with a ribbon on it in the driveway?

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Reply by outthere, May 12, 2014.

Permits? We don't need no stinking permits!

One of the nice things about living in a rural setting and not having any neighbors.

And DV, I'm all blue collar pal.

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Reply by dvogler, May 12, 2014.

Ah ha!  I knew it.  There's no way you could get away with that drain if permits were involved! 

Then I guess you're a builder or own a construction company?  No need to answer.  Glad I'm not alone!

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Reply by EMark, May 12, 2014.

Aha, Outhere has been outed.  LingProf slipped up, and now he has.  His real name is Alfonso Bedoya.

I'd post a link, but I'm having the same problem with that function that Big Al is having.  So, just search YouTube.

 

 

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Reply by dmcker, May 13, 2014.

I assume you're talking about those infernal 'badges' and what they represent.

Here are two versions:

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Reply by GregT, May 13, 2014.

 It just seems incongruous for you guys and your massive wine collections to have such a complete set of construction tools!  I think I'm the only blue-collar guy here! 

I sold my table saw but still have several circular saws, a router and two router tables, a chop saw, several hammers for framing and finishing, several drills, plenty of conduit of all sizes and pipe benders, trowels for cement and brick work, multiple ladders, levels, squares and any hand tool you want to do carpentry, electrical, plumbing or cement work.

I grew up building houses. First memory of being on a job site was before I started school. When I bought my house in Brooklyn, I stripped it down to the outer walls and floor beams and rebuilt it. Since it was hard to get good help, I did it myself. Put down the plywood flooring underlayment and cut, routed, and put in the wood floors on top - NOT some pre-finished crap BTW, but all finished in place. Also framed out the rooms, hung the kitchen cabinets, tore out all the old wiring and completely rewired the house, put on a new tar roof, swapped a door for a window, put in new lintels, etc.

Oh, and built a wine cellar.

Sometimes you go onto these various boards and people are all excited about getting their kitchens remodeled or building a wine cellar. That's because it's the first time they've been around any kind of construction site. Only thing I can't do is heating/cooling and I don't like to do plumbing either.

Some of us have a lot of tools. My uncle was a builder in Napa. He had plenty of tools. Obviously built his own house, or rather, several of his own houses. Had a decent size wine cellar too.

Only thing I've never done is used a nailer. Never. Always just pounded nails by hand. Probably would have been a smart purchase, but I never learned about them so never bought one. Even the flooring was done by hand.

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Reply by outthere, May 13, 2014.

When I built my addition I did everything myself short of the foundation. Never could have done a good job without my nail gun. No bent nails, no boards moving out of place plus the speed and lack of hand fatigue.

I'd post a link, but I'm having the same problem with that function that Big Al is having.

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Reply by dvogler, May 13, 2014.

Hey, I didn't say I thought you guys had soft hands like women!  Most guys have to fulfil an urge to construct or build or create.  I admit that I developed some idea that you were either engineers or computer guys or management sorts.  I wasn't surprised that OT is handy and building his project, but his tools suggest someone beyond a weekend warrior.  Greg, I too learned with few power tools.  Senco pneumatic nailers have been around a long time, like the Milwaukee Sawzall (the fifties I think).  Compressors have come along way though.  You can get a pretty decent compact compressor with enough CFM to power a framing nailer (or two) for under $200.  I laid down oak in my first house with the old cleat driver and a little sledge hammer.  Painful.

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Reply by GregT, May 14, 2014.

If I were doing it again, first thing I'd get would be a power nailer! I still have Grandad's Yankee screwdriver - height of tech at the time I guess. I think it dates sometime from the 1930s? Not sure though. Putting in floors with a sledge and hand nailer is back-breaking. I'd do that with a power nailer too. I just didn't know better.

OT - the place is looking great. I'd love to have a little project like that!  Enjoy working in the record heat though!

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Reply by Lucha Vino, May 15, 2014.

Looking forward to seeing the finished product in July.  I am in the midst of collecting Washington Syrah for the event.  Here is a picture of what I have so far.  Some nice donations from the wine makers!


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Reply by outthere, May 15, 2014.

Well done Lucha!

One of my guests told me yesterday that he is bringing a nice Cornas.

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Reply by dmcker, May 15, 2014.

Nice looking bottles, Lucha! Damn I'm wishing again I could be there.

Cornas are a dime a dozen (or rather several dimes stacked high, but they are availalble) where I am. Forget about even thinking of getting good Sonoma syrahs, much less anything special from Washington. Although the pizza place I was at tonight did have some K Syrah....

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Reply by outthere, May 20, 2014.

Update:

  • Framing complete.
  • Roof going on
  • Wiring stubbed in
  • Window installed
  • Recycled window $20
  • Siding going on
  • Reclaimed wood for siding $100

The dogs don't like the nail gun. Lots of nails still to go for the T-n-G siding though. Coming along nicely. Have a couple days this weekend to go hog wild. Should be ready for inside work by then.

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Reply by dmcker, May 20, 2014.

How are you intending to finish the siding, etc. (what degree of sanding, what surface coating, etc.)?

Love to see projects come together like this. The step-by-step photos are great.

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Reply by outthere, May 20, 2014.

It's meant to be rustic and to stay that way. The siding will remain as is, weathered with character. Will use the same wood on some of the interior as well. It will be open air for the most part. Protecting the framing with a vapor barrier but keeping it simple. All electrical outlets will be weather proof. 

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