Wine Talk

Snooth User: clintob

Wine fridge?

Original post by clintob, Feb 29, 2008.

I've read a few blog posts about this (even one at Snooth I believe?) but I'm looking for a good small wine fridge that's nice and quiet. I don't mind spending a few bucks for quality, but I want something that will fit inconspicuously in my small apartment, hold 8-12 bottles ideally, and in a perfect world would have two zones for red and white.

Anybody have suggestions?

Replies

2031
3202
Reply by Philip James, Apr 9, 2009.

OK, well unfortunately this shoots my idea in the foot. I thought about getting storage for several cases - a few few drinking one or two for aging. However, it sounds like I shouldn't be using a fridge for serious aging.

How about medium term aging? I like my wines young and fruity, but I'm thinking that some of the weightier ones would benefit from 6-12 months of aging. So even if I dont have the facilities to age wines for a decade, a little maturity would benefit.

244
772
Reply by Rodolphe Boulanger, Apr 9, 2009.

Then you should have no problem with a fridge.

However, if its only 6 to 12 months, don't you have a cool closet in your apartment? It's not like these things are fragile in that kind of timeframe so long as you keep them out of direct sunlight.

2031
3202
Reply by Philip James, Apr 9, 2009.

You've seen our apartment right? It's like a greenhouse inside a volcano in the summer there. I switch the AC off when I'm at work and its 90 degrees inside when i get home. I'm pretty sure that would cook a wine in 4 weeks.

244
772
Reply by Rodolphe Boulanger, Apr 9, 2009.

Don't you have blinds on all that glass?
Regardless, I see your point. Get to a Kmart/Target/Home Depot/Costco and get a cheap little number that'll allow you to hold stuff for 12 months.

20
3267
Reply by dmcker, Apr 9, 2009.

Judging by the Japanese experience, Philip, temperatures may even spike higher. My apartment in Tokyo has mainly eastern, not western, exposure, but it definitely went well above 100 on several summer days when I was away and left the AC off. That was in the living and dining rooms, though, and not in bedroom closets. If your pocketbook allows, you should check out the Forster options (no, I have no affiliation with them ;-) ).

RB, the perche tests spun out of bad experiences commercial shipping warehouses were having with them in the Tennozu area of Tokyo (landfill sites on the edge of Tokyo Bay). I was affiliated with a group called the 'Wine Quality Institute' (ワイン品質協会), which was active from the late '80s until it became a victim of the recession. This group was instrumental in pulling a number of issues to the attention of the industry here (which did not always make it popular). One of its early successes was getting everyone to (finally) use refrigerated containers. Have to admit I was long tired of opening a bottle that, for example, a mammoth trading company had imported, to find it fully cooked--later investigations turned up that 'dry' containers from France had been (after crossing the equator twice getting there) offloaded onto a Hong Kong dock, where they sat in tropical heat for a few days while different lots were mixed for a new ship to bring them to Yokohama, where they again sat on docks for a few days in the sun and heat. Practices like that, and the tax duties of the day which demanded a 100% markup on original purchase costs (including shipping), made Japanese winedrinking in the '80s a rare pleasure, indeed. And made the taskload of the WQI a busy one.

In the late '90s, when the industry had largely shifted to refrigerated containers and gotten more efficient with their container transfers, a couple of the more enlightened importers started noticing browning of their wines. The WQI found, working with a couple of them at the beginning of this decade, the problem with large Perche systems in their warehouses. Browning occurred after sometimes only a month or two, and even when the cooling unit was moved as far from the wine as possible. Alternatives were subsequently tested, and the Forster units found to be the best by a wide margin.

Having years of experience in several industries and countries, I am not entirely surprised that nothing has been written up about perche systems damaging the wine they're supposed to protect. Definitely not in the manufacturers' interests. And the greater proportion of consumers may not even register the difference. A combination of fast turnover, and innocence, perhaps. The greater proportion of Perche systems may also be in use in Asia, with its shallower wine culture, though I have no access to industry figures on that type of distribution. Nonetheless, you can see a trickle of complaints about consumer coolers employing them in Japanese-language wine blogs and forums in recent years.

23
145
Reply by kylewolf, Aug 21, 2009.

for everyone who was looking for a 60-ish bottle wine fridge. I found this at sam's club for just under $600.
http://www.samsclub.com/shopping/na...

I am considering this fridge but I wanted others opinions at well.

7127
2942
Reply by Gregory Dal Piaz, Aug 21, 2009.

Hi Kyle,

The link doesn't work for me.

54
72
Reply by rhill2990, Aug 21, 2009.

After reading some of the posts regarding wine coolers, I went to my local appliance store and took the plunge. I found a Danby cooler priced at $200. It is supposed to hold 35 bottles. I think I have around twenty or so in there now and it is pretty full. It is a simple solution and I like it pretty well. I don't intend to cellar long term, just mainly buy and drink.

23
145
Reply by kylewolf, Aug 21, 2009.

odd, the link doesn't work for me either and it says the item can not be found...it worked a few hours ago. maybe later look it up. it is a danby 75 bottle fridge for around $600.

23
145
Reply by kylewolf, Aug 21, 2009.

here is another link...
http://www.beveragefactory.com/refr...
not as cheap as sams club but go ahead and give it a once over.

805
538
Reply by Eric Guido, Aug 21, 2009.

I'll just recommend to anyone looking for a 20 - 50 bottle wine fridge that if you have the room then you may want to consider going bigger. When I first started with wine, I couldn't imagine having more than 50 bottles and so I bought a 50 bottle Eurocave... well, within a year it was full. First you start thinking about special occasion wines, then it's wines you love and want to keep a few around and before you know it you develop a love for Barolo or Bordeaux and want to put some new releases away for the future.

Make sure to plan for room for expansion because buying one big one is a lot cheaper than buying a small one and realizing you need to buy another later down the road. I understand the NYC space thing too but keep in mind that wine fridges make for great conversation pieces and so you can put them just about anywhere.

16
16
Reply by Natalie Kronick, Sep 24, 2009.

Phillip, you should just have this really cool wine cellar built into the floor of your place (if you're on the ground floor, of course). I WILL have one of these put in one day! Too cool not to!
http://www.spiralcellars.co.uk/showcase/

Otherwise, I'd display the 'everyday' wines in a cool way around your place for easy access and get a tall wine fridge to put against the wall for the 'aging' bottles. You can find space in all kinds of places. Do you have wall space or space up high (this will work if you have temp-control).

2031
3202
Reply by Philip James, Sep 24, 2009.



I have neighbours downstairs that might not be too happy when I build a sunken wine cellar into their living room. Very cool though

1
240
Reply by cigarman168, Sep 24, 2009.

Philip, may be you can share with your neighbours downstairs to use this cellars then both will happy. Just joking.

0
9
Reply by neale1, Oct 12, 2009.

Go to Lowes or HomeDepot they have a good collection of really inexpensive terrific Wine Chillers.

Best

23
145
Reply by kylewolf, Oct 12, 2009.

I agree with neale, also Sam's Club carries a few 75 bottle models on-line for reasonable prices. though I have to say per bottle, Home depot, with their magic chef 45 or 50 bottle fridges for $250-350 is the best buy. I am honestly just biding my time until my next student loan check to purchase myself a magic chef.

10
27
Reply by mbugbee, Oct 19, 2009.

I just moved into a new house that has a California basement (small room just big enough for the furnace and water heater - crawl space separating the ground and main floor) and two 16-bottle wine fridges and some wood racks. One of my fridges is working and the other doesn't. My solution: Keep the working fridge in the family room for everyday wine and keeping the rest in the basement with the wines for long-term aging in the fridge that doesn't work (for extra insulation). Sound like I'm on the right track? Btw - I'm in LA, so the summers can have prolonged stretches of 100+ degree days.

20
3267
Reply by dmcker, Oct 20, 2009.

I wouldn't keep the wine in the basement with the waterheater and furnace. Too many temperature fluctuations. Would be better in a closet somewhere else in the house far from exposed exterior walls.

I grew up in a couple of houses with similar basements, just north of L.A. Hopefully you won't find the basement half full of water after a particularly nasty winter rainstorm...

10
27
Reply by mbugbee, Oct 21, 2009.

Hmmm... I don't really have any closets that aren't exposed to exterior walls. Guess I should put my good stuff in the crawl space?

20
3267
Reply by dmcker, Oct 22, 2009.

If you mean the rafters above the ceiling, you should be sure of summer temperature highs and averages before deciding on that. Otherwise you might be conducting an experiment attempting to turn California zins and cabs into port or madeira, while still in the original bottle... ;-(



Continue to the end of the thread to reply
Back to Categories

Popular Topics

Top Contributors This Month

259386 Snooth User: zufrieden
259386zufrieden
8 posts
89564 Snooth User: GregT
89564GregT
7 posts
1413489 Snooth User: dvogler
1413489dvogler
6 posts

Categories

View All




Snooth Media Network