Wine Talk

Snooth User: KathyVann

Wine storage tips

Posted by KathyVann, Nov 24, 2016.

Hello all,

I'm not actually a beginner in wine preparation. I started preparing wine 3 months ago. I've tasted different varieties of wine and my favorite is Merlot wine. I had a doubt earlier on how to store the prepared wine. I searched many sources and asked many friends and  I happened to read an article yesterday which had tips to properly store the wine in cellar. Found it very useful and hope it'll be useful to you too. It had all information like required temperature, humidity, light etc and the things which we should not do while storing them. hope you'll find it useful.

1 2 3 next

Replies

20
3259
Reply by dmcker, Nov 24, 2016.

"Preparing wine" = ??

Was happy to welcome you in your other thread, but not so happy at the paucity of real posts then the quick jump to push offsite products and services. Here we're all about real people reacting in real ways about wine in our lives, not sales and marketing push and pulls.

If you care to talk about your interaction with wine in your life with us, you're still very welcome here. But if you just want to peddle some crosslinking to product manufacturer sites, not so much so.

Cheers

0
959
Reply by dvogler, Nov 24, 2016.

Kathy, are you or a relative employed by Lancaster Closets and Cabinets?

 

0
277
Reply by bostonlobsterman, Nov 24, 2016.

Troll. 

326
73
Reply by rckr1951, Nov 24, 2016.

I just don't understand this kind of thinking.   Do they feel they are capable of the right hand/left hand ploy without time involved or maybe if she would have done her home work, posted this to the correct thread and was honest about it, a little more respect would be garnered.

No much - but some.

0
17
Reply by KathyVann, Nov 24, 2016.

I'm sorry.. I just thought that it is a useful information and thought of sharing it with you. I didn't have any other intention. I was searching for information on storing them and came across this. I didn't have any intention of marketing here.. Anyway I'm sorry for making you feel like that.

20
3259
Reply by dmcker, Nov 25, 2016.

Recently lots of spammers here, Kathy, is why were so sensitive to it. Would very much enjoy hearing more about the merlot you're drinking, and any other wine you find either enjoyable or, for that matter, pretty much dreck.

Hoping you'll join us in talking about such a wonderful libation....

0
17
Reply by KathyVann, Nov 25, 2016.

Sure DMCKER.. I'll surely share my experiences with you all.. Hope to hear your experiences too.. 

326
73
Reply by rckr1951, Nov 25, 2016.

That would be wonderful.

0
277
Reply by bostonlobsterman, Nov 25, 2016.

If that happens, I will take down my troll post and apologize profusely. But as it stands gentleman, read the posts carefully, they all are void of content and could have been written by a computer. A computer wants a reply, any reply, for then it knows the door is open to flood spam. It seems the big spam moves in after these suspicious one-time new user posts. 

0
17
Reply by KathyVann, Nov 29, 2016.

Hello all,

How did you all get into wine drinking?? I would like to hear all your experiences..

0
959
Reply by dvogler, Nov 29, 2016.

Kathy,

I'll give you my Reader's Digest version.  After being excommunicated from the Mormon Church at the ripe age of 20, I was living in California with my partner in sin-soon to be wife.  I was from British Columbia, which then (1989) was not producing much decent wine.  So I started having a glass of wine periodically with dinner at restaurants.  Moved back to Victoria and only occasionally would have mostly Italian wine and eventually fell in love with Amarone.  Forward to about ten years ago and BC wine really improved and with the goading of a friend, realized there were some great wines here.  My palate has evolved and I love trying things and finding surprises (for example a cheap Puglia Negroamaro on the weekend that was really decent). I'm currently a Washington State wine fan over most others.

326
73
Reply by rckr1951, Nov 29, 2016.

Kathy - Been drinking wines for 45 years now - don't remember my 1st but I have 2 experiences that changed me forever.  In 1973 I shared a bottle of good Bordeaux at a restaurant in Baraboo, Wi (We were blessed in that the owner was a oenophile that traveled to France and ordered regularly.)  In 1976 I was at a restaurant in Freemantle,Aus and had 1973 Humter Valley Semillio with Dulhe fish and clam sauce.  those were my epiphany wines - the Aussie made the biggest impact because of the food.

I really have no preferences - my wine cellar is International in nature and had learned to cook meals from different areas to accompany those wines.

0
17
Reply by KathyVann, Nov 29, 2016.

That's really great DVOGLER and RCKR1951.. My first wine drinking experience was 3 years ago.. I went to The Good Son restaurant with my friend. That's the first time I tasted Merlot wine. I was totally new to wine, so it was my friend who bought me that wine. First I took a small sip and that's it. I just loved it.. It was smooth and it had plum and cherry flavor and it was wonderful. Every time Merlot wine will be the first thing in my menu.. I'm kind of addicted to it..

0
959
Reply by dvogler, Nov 30, 2016.

Kathy,

You might hear people say to expand your tastes and experiences, but I say take your time.  Eventually your palate will change a bit and you'll taste something that will make you think maybe merlot, although good, may not be the 'best'.  You'll know when it's time to get out of the merlot box :)

 

20
3577
Reply by Richard Foxall, Nov 30, 2016.

Kathy: I can't really tell exactly when I became aware of wine because my parents, including my ex-communicated Mormon mother, let us have a small amount with Sunday dinner from the time I was young.  There are always steps along the road--a wine that makes you want to know more generally; a wine or event that makes you interested in new kinds of wine; a visit to a winery,  preferably with the winemaker, where you realize there's science, history, and personalities behind this.  Where wine takes you is up to you and fate. 

I'm with DVogler, or DV as we call him, that you should just enjoy what you enjoy. One day, if you feel like you've had enough merlot for a while, try something different, maybe one of those amarones, which are plummy and ripe, so kind of similar, or a blend with some merlot.  Something kind of low acid, low tannin is in your wheelhouse, I'm guessing.  Ask the server or wine shop or whatever what's like your favorite, but just a little different.  Then you'll be on the road to the insanity we all suffer:  Check out things like the "Now for Something Completely Different" thread, for one. 

No one is obliged to drink anything for any reason beyond enjoyment--if you like $7 Cotes du Rhone, or crazy expensive Burgundies, or culty Juras, or Clos du Bois Merlot, that's your call. 

326
73
Reply by rckr1951, Nov 30, 2016.

Kathy - DV & Richard are giving you good advise and if I could maybe offer one other thing - food.- various cultures have adapted the food and wine pairings down to a science.  That why Chimichurri steak goes great with Malbec and Torrontes. 

Dining out at different places that offers wine with their food are a good way to learn other wines - ask the somm or the maitr'd their recommendations.  It's a slow process, but the world of food and wine is fun to explore.

 

20
3577
Reply by Richard Foxall, Nov 30, 2016.

Anytime I see an interesting wine on a BTG (by the glass) list, I take advantage of it.  I don't have to invest in a bottle, never mind a case, and you hope the restaurant chose it well to go with the food.  Plus then I don't know what it really cost them (if I am unfamiliar with the label, etc) and I don't judge the fairness of the mark-up, which can skew my experience.  Good point there, RCKR!

0
2388
Reply by GregT, Nov 30, 2016.

Kathy, the problem with the link is that it's factually wrong. Let's start with this:

"So, oxidation happens quicker when the temperature is higher, while gases diffuse into liquids more rapidly with lower temperatures."

Diffusion is temperature-dependent. It's kinetic energy causing random motion. At warmer temperatures, the motion is faster. Thus, gases diffuse into liquids more rapidly at HIGHER temperatures.

Then there's this:

"Refrigeration causes dehumidifying resulting in a drying out of corks"

Most frost-free refrigerators, meaning most on the market today, are fairly dry and of course cold air holds less moisture than warm air. But the humidity in the wine bottle is around 100 percent. How does the cork dry out from the exposed end, about the size of a dime? And how does it dry out if there's a capsule on the cork, a capsule that could be made of plastic or metal? I'm looking at a 250 bottle wine fridge in my apartment at the moment and it is not regulating humidity. Nor did my basement cellar. But I've kept wine in both for years and it was quite OK. I suppose if I lived in the desert I might think more about humidity, but I wouldn't put gravel down and spray it with water. You're more likely to grow mold and mildew than to help your wine. And if your wine bottles are likely to be in the house and your house hits temps in the 90s when you're not home, put your wine in the fridge!

:An air bubble will form at the top, rather than in the middle of the bottle, which is preferable for slowing down aging and allowing oxidation to happen gradually."

This indicates that the writer doesn't know anything at all about how wine ages and I stopped reading. I should have stopped at the section regarding light, but foolishly I didn't.

Anyway, the main storage tip to remember is to keep your wine relatively cool. The cooler you keep it, the slower most reactions will be.

UV light can also cause some changes, particularly to red grapes, but there's no science that I know of regarding incandescent, fluorescent, LED, or other artificial light. So the main thing regarding light is to keep your wine out of the sun.

Welcome and post some more!

 

 

0
17
Reply by KathyVann, Nov 30, 2016.

Thank you all for sharing such valuable experiences and thank you GREGT for the information.. It is really useful. 

Every time when I visit any restaurant i'll think that I should try something different. But once the server comes, I'll say "one Merlot wine please".. My friend used to say that I should try different varieties of wine. But I'll be just sticking to the Merlot wine..I think that I need some more time to change my mind. She said that she'll take me to another restaurant this month during Christmas, and she'll order the wine for me. So I hope I'll be tasting another wonderful wine this month. Will tell my experience with the new wine after Christmas.

0
959
Reply by dvogler, Nov 30, 2016.

Kathy,

When your friend takes you and orders the wine, try to not look at the bottle.  Have it opened and poured without knowing what it is.  Take a good couple of deep sniffs and think about what you're smelling.  Take a sip and let it get all over your tongue, swallow it and again think about what sensations you're getting and try to detect some of the smells you had.  If at first you aren't crazy about it, or if there's a bit of something on the nose that you disagree with, bear in mind it was just opened.  A half hour can do wonders to a just opened bottle.  As Paul said, food also will make you sense the wine differently. Give this new wine a chance over the course of the meal.  Find out after what the grape (or blend) was.  You may be pleasantly surprised.

1 2 3 next



Continue to the end of the thread to reply
Back to Categories

Popular Topics

  • posts

Top Contributors This Month

259386 Snooth User: zufrieden
259386zufrieden
40 posts
1413489 Snooth User: dvogler
1413489dvogler
26 posts
357808 Snooth User: vin0vin0
357808vin0vin0
9 posts

Categories

View All




Snooth Media Network